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App | Cloud Computing Accounting Software



A Cloud Computing Accounting Software is an accounting software that is hosted on remote servers. It provides accounting capabilities to businesses in a fashion similar to the SaaS (Software as a Service) business model. Data is sent into “the cloud,” where it is processed and returned to the user. All application functions are performed off-site, not on the user’s desktop.

In cloud computing, users access software applications remotely through the Internet or other network via a cloud application service provider. Using cloud computing accounting software frees the business from having to install and maintain software on individual desktop computers. It also allows employees in remote or branch offices to access the same data and the same version of the software.

Most  application providers typically charge based on usage – compared to site license fees associated with traditional accounting software deployments. Accounting data backup and disaster recovery  is often a part of your cloud computing accounting software account.

Cloud computing accounting software may also be referred to as online accounting software or Web-based accounting software.

A class of computer software, or program that helps accounting professionals manage accounts and perform accounting operations. The simplest accounting programs, sometimes called personal finance managers, are single-entry systems that automate tasks such as check writing and record keeping.

Double-entry systems include functions for general ledger, accounts receivable, and accounts payable. More sophisticated systems also support functions for payroll, inventory, invoicing, and fixed assets. Some high-end systems even support sales analysis and time billing.

Storage infrastructure that is managed and automated by intelligent software as opposed to by the storage hardware itself. In this way, the pooled storage infrastructure resources in a software-defined storage (SDS) environment can be automatically and efficiently allocated to match the application needs of an enterprise.

Separating the Storage Hardware from the Software


By separating the storage hardware from the software that manages the storage infrastructure, software-defined storage enables enterprises to purchase heterogeneous storage hardware without having to worry as much about issues such as interoperability, under- or over-utilization of specific storage resources, and manual oversight of storage resources.


The software that enables a software-defined storage environment can provide functionality such as deduplication, replication, thin provisioning, snapshots and other backup and restore capabilities across a wide range of server hardware components. The key benefits of software-defined storage over traditional storage are increased flexibility, automated management and cost efficiency.

Software-Defined Storage is Not Storage Virtualization

Software-defined storage is sometimes confused with the term storage virtualization, but as an article from CRN explains, while the latter term involves separating capacity from specific storage hardware resources (and thereby pooling storage devices), SDS involves separating the storage capabilities and services from the storage hardware.

Prominent examples of software-defined-storage include OpenStack, EMC ViPR, Nexenta and HP StoreVirtual.


A marketing term coined by HP for its ultra-low power Project Moonshot servers developed for specific data center workloads such as cloud computing and big data. The HP Moonshot software-defined servers use 89 percent less power and 80 percent less space than traditional server systems and reduce complexity by 97 percent.


Benefits of Software Defined Servers

Software-defined servers achieve these feats by sharing a variety of components, including cooling and networking and power supplies, as well as management software such as HP’s Integrated Lights-Out software tools. Software-defined servers derive their name from these shared software management tools, which are able to dynamically assign and efficiently manage workloads across the servers in a system.

SDDC is short for software-defined data center.
May also be called software-defined datacenter (SDD) or virtual data center.

Software-defined data center (SDDC) is the phrase used to refer to a data center where all infrastructure is virtualized and delivered as a service. Control of the data center is fully automated by software, meaning hardware configuration is maintained through intelligent software systems. This is in contrast to traditional data centers where the infrastructure is typically defined by hardware and devices.

Software-defined data centers are considered by many to be the next step in the evolution of virtualization and cloud computing as it provides a solution to support both legacy enterprise applications and new cloud computing services.

Core Components of the Software-Defined Data Center

According to Torsten Volk, EMA, there are three core components of the software-defined data center: network virtualization, server virtualization and storage virtualization. A business logic layer is also required to translate application requirements, SLAs, policies and cost considerations.
Software-defined data center is a relatively new enterprise computing phrase, but a number of vendors have announced software-defined data center products, including the VMware vCloud Suite.

A term coined by IBM for its “software-defined everything” vision. The company’s Software-Defined Environments (SDE) group is the latest evolution of what first began as the Application, Integration and Middleware group inside the IBM Software group.

According to this eWeek article, IBM says “a Software-Defined Environment (SDE) optimizes the entire computing infrastructure – compute, storage and network resources – so that it can adapt to the type of work required. In today’s environment, resources are assigned manually to workloads; that happens automatically in a SDE.”

By dynamically assigning workloads to IT resources based on a variety of factors, including the characteristics of specific applications, the best-available resources, and service-level policies, a software-defined environment can deliver continuous, dynamic optimization and reconfiguration to address infrastructure issues.

SDN is short for software defined networking.


Software defined networking (SDN) is an approach to using open protocols, such as OpenFlow, to apply globally aware software control at the edges of the network to access network switches and routers that typically would use closed and proprietary firmware.


Benefits of SDN

Software defined networking offers numerous benefits including on-demand provisioning, automated load balancing, streamlined physical infrastructure and the ability to scale network resources in lockstep with application and data needs. As noted on Enterprise Networking Planet, coupled with the ongoing virtualization of servers and storage, SDN ushers in no less than the completely virtualized data center, where end-to-end compute environments will be deployed and decommissioned on a whim.

SDN Challenges: Legacy Network Infrastructure

Legacy network infrastructure is typically a mix of vendor solutions, platforms and protocol solutions making the ultimate goal of an integrated network ecosystem a difficult process for many organizations. According to Enterprise Networking Planet, it is feasible, though perhaps not optimal, to implement software defined networking on existing physical infrastructure. Today, the enterprise and large customers look to build new SDN infrastructure from the ground up.
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